• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Mon, 17.06.24

Search results


January 2022
Tamar Tzur MD, Yossi Tzur MD, Shaul Baruch MD, Noam Smorgick MD, and Yaakov Melcer MD

Background: A paraovarian cyst (POC) is located between the ovary and the fallopian tube. In many cases POCs are diagnosed and managed as ovarian cysts. But since POC are a distinct entity in their clinical presentation and surgical intervention, they should be better defined.

Objectives: To describe the clinical perioperative and operative characteristics of patients with POCs in order to improve pre-operative diagnosis and management.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study of patients with an operative diagnosis of POC between 2007 and 2019 in a single university-affiliated tertiary care medical center was included. Demographic characteristics as well as symptoms, sonographic appearance, surgery findings, and histology results were retrieved from electronic medical records.

Results: During the study period 114 patients were surgically diagnosed with POC, 57.9% were in their reproductive years and 24.6% were adolescents. Most presented with abdominal pain (77.2%). Preoperative sonographic exams accurately diagnosed POC in only 44.7% of cases, and 50.9% underwent surgery due to suspected torsion, which was surgically confirmed in 70.7% of cases. Among women with confirmed torsion, 28.9% involved the fallopian tube without involvement of the ipsilateral ovary. Histology results showed benign cysts in all cases, except two, with a pathological diagnosis of serous borderline tumor.

Conclusions: POC should always be part of the differential diagnosis of women presenting with lower abdominal pain and sonographic evidence of adnexal cysts. If POC is suspected there should be a high level of suspicion for adnexal torsion and low threshold for surgical intervention, especially in adolescent, population who are prone to torsion

January 2021
Yaakov Melcer MD, Shira Dvash MD, Ron Maymon MD, Marina Pekar-Zlotin MD, Zvi Vaknin MD, Tamar Tzur MD, and Noam Smorgick MD

Background: Adnexal torsion in pregnancy is often associated with functional adnexal cysts, especially in pregnancies conceived by ovulation induction (OI) or in-vitro fertilization (IVF). During laparoscopy for adnexal de-torsion, drainage of the functional cysts can be attempted, although this procedure may cause bleeding.

Objectives: To investigate the characteristics of ovarian torsion in pregnancy associated with functional cysts and to compare the rate of torsion recurrence following de-torsion alone versus cyst drainage.

Methods: All cases of surgically diagnosed adnexal torsion occurring during pregnancy between January 2007 and April 2019 in our department were retrospectively analyzed. The cases of torsion associated with presumed functional ovarian cysts were selected. The rate of recurrent torsion during the same pregnancy was compared for de-torsion alone versus de-torsion and cyst aspiration.

Results: Of the 113 women who experienced adnexal torsion during pregnancy, 71 (67.0%) of torsion cases were caused by presumed functional ovarian cysts. Among women with torsion of functional ovarian cysts, the rate of torsion recurrence was significantly higher in patients who underwent de-torsion alone (n=28) compared to women who underwent aspiration and drainage of the ovarian cysts (n=43) (14.3% vs. 0, P = 0.021). There were no cases of intra- or post-operative bleeding in the study cohort.

Conclusions: Functional ovarian cysts are the most common adnexal pathology encountered in pregnant women with torsion. Intra-operative cyst aspiration and drainage may reduce the risk of recurrent torsion. Further multi-center studies are required to validate our data prospectively.

April 2013
T. Silberstein, A. Burg, J. Blumenfeld, B. Sheizaf, T. Tzur and O. Saphier
 Background: Breast milk is well established as the ideal source of nutrition for infants. Mature human breast milk generally contains 3.5–4.5% lipids comprising mostly triacylglycerols. In general, the fat composition of maternal human milk in developing countries shows higher levels of saturated fats, reflecting diets rich in carbohydrates.

Objectives: To determine the profile of unsaturated fatty acids in the breast milk of two populations in southern Israel, Jewish and rural tent-dwelling Bedouin women.

Methods: This study involved 48 lactating Israeli mothers, 29 Jewish and 19 Bedouin (16–20 weeks postpartum), whose full-term infants were fed exclusively with breast milk. Total milk lipid extracts were transmethylated and analyzed by using an improved gas chromatographic method.

Results: The breast milk of the Bedouin women contained significantly higher levels of total major saturated fatty acids, lauric acid and palmitic acid (45.2 ± 4.7% vs. 41.0 ± 5.6%, P = 0.005; 5.2 ± 2.1 vs. 6.8 ± 2.0%, P = 0.03; and 22.7 ± 2.4 vs. 20.6 ± 3.8%, P = 0.02) respectively. No difference was found in the myristic acid level between the groups. The level of stearic acid was significantly higher in the Jewish group compared to the Bedouin group (5.7 ± 1.1 vs. 5.1 ± 1.1%, P = 0.04). There was a linear correlation between the levels of C14:0 and C12:0 in the Bedouin and Jewish groups respectively (R = 0.87, R = 0.82, P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Higher levels of saturated fatty acids were measured in the breast milk of Bedouin women, an economically weaker population. The results emphasize the importance of diet among lactating women and its influence on milk quality. 

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel