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עמוד בית
Fri, 30.09.22

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February 2017
Gal Ben Haim MD, Uri Manor, Sarit Appel MD, Shadan Lalezari MD, Reuma Margalit-Yehuda MD and Shmuel Steinlauf MD
January 2006
E. Meltzer, L. Guranda, L. Vassilenko, M. Krupsky, S. Steinlauf and Y. Sidi.

Background: Lipoid pneumonia is a pneumonitis resulting from the aspiration of lipids, and is commonly associated with the use of mineral oil as a laxative. LP[1] is relatively unfamiliar to clinicians and is probably underdiagnosed.

Objectives: To increase physicians' awareness of LP, its diagnosis and prevention.

Methods: We present two illustrative cases of LP and review the literature.

Results: Two cases of LP were diagnosed within half a year in an internal medicine ward. Both cases were elderly patients, and LP was associated with the use of mineral oil as a laxative agent. Computerized tomography revealed bilateral low attenuation infiltrates, associated with a "crazy paving" pattern in one case. Sudan Black staining was diagnostic in both cases – in one on a transbronchial biopsy specimen, and in the other on sputum cytologic examination. Both patients suffered from neurologic diseases and were at risk of aspiration. In both cases clinical symptoms and signs continued for several months prior to diagnosis but resolved after the mineral oil was discontinued.

Conclusions: LP often occurs in elderly patients who are at risk of aspiration. The condition may be underdiagnosed. Since in most cases mineral oil cathartics are the causative agent, an effort at primary prevention is indicated. It is suggested that the licensing of mineral oil for internal use be changed.

April 2002
Eyal Meltzer, MD and Shmuel Steinlauf, MD

Background: Lithium has been a part of the psychiatric pharmacopoeia for more than half a century. Its efficacy is marred by a narrow therapeutic index and significant toxicity.

Objectives: To increase physicians’ awareness of the various manifestations of lithium intoxication.

Methods: We reviewed the clinical data of cases of lithium poisoning occurring in a municipal hospital during a 10 year period.

Results: Eight patient records were located. The mortality rate was 12.5%. All patients were women and the mean age was 66.4 years. The most common symptoms were neurological. One illustrative case is described in detail with lithium serum levels showing the usual two-phase decline.

Conclusions: Lithium poisoning can present in many forms. Increased physician awareness and the early use of effective treatment, mainly hemodialysis, will prevent mortality and protracted morbidity associated with this condition.
 

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