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עמוד בית
Tue, 23.07.24

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March 2020
Misgav Rottenstreich MD MBA, Ortal Reznick MD, Hen Y. Sela MD, Alexander Ioscovich MD, Sorina Grisaro Granovsky MD PhD, Carolyn F. Weiniger MD and Sharon Einav MD MSc

Background: Admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) is an objective marker of severe maternal morbidity (SMM).

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of obstetric ICU admissions in one medical center in Israel and to characterize this population.

Methods: In this retrospective study the files of women coded for pregnancy, birth, or the perinatal period and admission to the ICU were pulled for data extraction (2005–2013).

Results: During the study period, 111 women were admitted to the ICU among 120,279 women who delivered babies (0.09%). Their average age was 30 ± 6 years, most were multigravida, a few had undergone fertility treatments, and only 27% had complicated previous pregnancies. Most pregnancies (71.2%) were uneventful prior to admission. ICU admissions were divided equally between direct (usually hemorrhage) and indirect (usually cardiac disease) obstetric causes.

Conclusions: The indications for obstetrics ICU admission correlated with the proximate causes of maternal arrest observed worldwide. While obstetric hemorrhage is often unpredictable, deterioration of heart disease is foreseeable. Attention should be directed specifically toward improving the diagnosis and treatment of maternal heart disease during pregnancy in Israel.

Yigal Helviz MD, Tehila Hajaj MD, Ayala Burger PhD, Phillip D. Levin MD BChir and Sharon Einav MD MSc

Background: The use of a high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) was examined for different clinical indications in the critically ill.

Objectives: To describe a single center experience with HFNC in post-extubation critical care patients by using clinical indices.

Methods: In this single center study, the authors retrospectively evaluated the outcome of patients who were connected to the HFNC after their extubation in the intensive care unit (ICU). At 48 hours after the extubation, the patients were divided into three groups: the group weaned from HFNC, the ongoing HFNC group, and the already intubated group.

Results: Of the 80 patients who were included, 42 patients were without HFNC support at 48 hours after extubation, 22 and 16 patients were with ongoing HFNC support and already intubated by this time frame, respectively. The mean ROX index (the ratio of SpO2 divided by fraction of inspired oxygen to respiratory rate) at 6 hours of the weaned group was 12.3 versus 9.3 in the ongoing HFNC group, and 8.5 in the reintubated group (P = 0.02). The groups were significantly different by the ICU length of stay, tracheostomy rate, and mortality.

Conclusions: Among patients treated with HFNC post-extubation of those who had a higher ROX index were less likely to undergo reintubation.

February 2016
Yigal Helviz MD, Ilia Dzigivker MD, David Raveh-Brawer MD, Moshe Hersch MD, Shoshana Zevin MD and Sharon Einav MD

Background: Enoxaparin is frequently used as prophylaxis for deep venous thrombosis in critically ill patients. 

Objectives: To evaluate three enoxaparin prophylactic regimens in critical care patients with and without administration of a vasopressor.

Methods: Patients admitted to intensive care units (general and post-cardiothoracic surgery) without renal failure received, once daily, a subcutaneous fixed dose of 40 mg enoxaparin, a subcutaneous dose of 0.5 mg/kg enoxaparin, or an intravenous dose of 0.5 mg/kg enoxaparin. Over 5 days anti-activated factor X levels were collected before the daily administration and 4 hours after the injection.

Results: Overall, 16 patients received the subcutaneous fixed dose, 15 received the subcutaneous weight-based dosage, and 8 received the dose intravenously. Around two-fifths (38%) of the patients received vasopressors. There was no difference between anti-activated factor X levels regarding vasopressor administration. However, in all three groups the levels were outside the recommended range of 0.1 IU/ml and 0.3 IU/ml.

Conclusions: Although not influenced by vasopressor administration, the enoxaparin regimens resulted in blood activity levels outside the recommended range.

 

March 2014
Yigal Helviz, Moshe Hersch, David Raveh, Lev Shmulovich and Sharon Einav
February 2006
R.M Spira, P. Reissman, S. Goldberg, M. Hersch and S. Einav

Three decades have elapsed since the inception of Level I trauma centers as the final link in the trauma system "chain of survival".

November 2003
E. Soudry, C.L. Sprung, P.D. Levin, G.B. Grunfeld and S. Einav

Background:  Physicians’ decisions regarding provision of life-sustaining treatment may be influenced considerably by non-medical variables.

Objectives: To examine physicians’ attitudes towards end-of-life decisions in Israel, comparing them to those found in the United States.

Methods: A survey was conducted among members of the Israel Society of Critical Care Medicine using a questionnaire analogous to that used in a similar study in the USA.       

Results: Forty-three physicians (45%) responded, the majority of whom hold responsibility for withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatments. Preservation of life was considered the most important factor by 31 respondents (72%). The quality of life as viewed by the patient was generally considered less important than the quality of life as viewed by the physician. Twenty-one respondents (49%) considered withholding treatment more acceptable than withdrawing it. The main factors for decisions to withhold or withdraw therapy were a very low probability of survival of hospitalization, an irreversible acute disorder, and prior existence of chronic disorders. An almost similar percent of physicians (93% for Israel and 94% for the U.S.) apply Do Not Resuscitate orders in their intensive care units, but much less (28% vs. 95%) actually discuss these orders with the families of their patients.

Conclusions:  Critical care physicians in Israel place similar emphasis on the value of life as do their U.S. counterparts and assign DNR[1] orders with an incidence equaling that of the U.S. They differ from their U.S. counterparts in that they confer less significance to the will of the patient, and do not consult as much with families of patients regarding DNR orders.






[1] DNR = Do Not Resuscitate


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