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עמוד בית
Tue, 05.12.23

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April 2021
Eytan Damari MD, Alon Farfel MD, Itai Berger MD, Reut Ron, and Yonatan Yeshayahu MD

Background: The effect of extended shift length on pediatric residency is controversial. Israeli residents perform shifts extending up to 26 hours, a practice leading to general dissatisfaction. In early 2020, during the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, many Israeli hospitals transitioned from 26-hour shifts to 13-hour shifts in fixed teams (capsules) followed by a 24-hour rest period at home. The regulation changes enacted by the Israeli government during the COVID-19 pandemic provided a rare opportunity to assess perception by residents regarding length of shifts before and after the change.

Objectives: To assess perception of pediatric residency in three aspects: resident wellness, ability to deliver quality healthcare, and acquisition of medical education following the change to the shorter shifts model.

Methods: We performed a prospective observational study among pediatric residents. Residents completed an online self-assessment questionnaire before and after the COVID-19 emergency regulations changed toward shorter shifts.

Results: Sixty-seven residents answered the questionnaires before (37) and after (30) the shift changes. The average score was significantly better for the 13-hour shifts versus the 26-hour shifts, except for questions regarding available time for research. There was a positive perception regarding the shorter night shifts model among pediatric residents, with an increase in general satisfaction and improvement in perception of general wellness, ability to deliver quality healthcare, and medical education acquisition.

Conclusions: Following the change to shorter shift length, perception of pediatric residents included improvement in wellness, ability to deliver quality healthcare, and availability of medical education

September 2011
I. Berger

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is among the most prevalent chronic health disorders affecting school-age children. The disorder is the subject of much debate for several reasons, the major one being the diagnostic process, which in some aspects is unstructured and can be relatively easily biased. The impact of undiagnosed or misdiagnosed ADHD on the lives of many children can be severe. Therefore, it is important to understand the complexities of the diagnostic procedure in ADHD, including the cultural bias effect, the limitations of the DSM-IV-TR definitions, the effect of comorbid conditions on the diagnostic process, the gene-environment interactions, and the need to compose an objective, more accurate, and generally accepted diagnostic battery of tests. This review addresses the diagnostic difficulties of ADHD and considers some steps that would make ADHD a more easily identifiable disorder.
 

September 2010
I. Berger and G. Goldzweig

Background: Most aspects of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosis rely on subjective judgment. Computerized continuous performance tests are designed to improve the validity of the process but are controversial due to low odds ratios. There is a need to find more definitive measures of assessment.

Objectives: To test the validity and reliability of a new tool, a computerized continuous performance functions test, which includes a multi-task approach designed to achieve a higher odds ratio of assessment.

Methods: We applied this test to 58 children aged 6–12 years: 45 were diagnosed as ADHD[1] and 13 non-ADHD children served as a control group.

Results: The CPF[2] test was able to differentiate between non-ADHD and ADHD children. CPF test results were more accurate than other continuous performance tests. The results were statistically significant in all test parameters, confirming the test's validity and reliability. 

Conclusions: The CPF test includes a combination of tasks based on an algorithm designed to test several domains of attention. In this pilot study the CPF test was found to be a valid and reliable tool for the diagnosis of ADHD in children. This test might increase the diagnostic utility of computerized tests. The research points to the need for developing a more definitive process for ADHD diagnosis.

 






[1] ADHD = attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder



[2] CPF = continuous performance functions


December 2002
Itai Berger MD, Solomon Jaworowski MBBS FRANZCP and Varda Gross-Tsur MD
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