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עמוד בית
Thu, 18.07.24

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March 2018
Michal Solomon MD, Aviv Barzilai MD, Hila Elphasy MD, Henri Trau MD and Sharon Baum MD

Background: Erysipelas, an acute infection of the dermal and subcutaneous tissue, is normally treated with antibiotics. Previous data indicated that treatment with prednisone in combination with antibiotics results in significant acceleration of the healing phase.

Objectives: To investigate the effectiveness of corticosteroids combined with antibiotics for the treatment of erysipelas.

Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on hospitalized patients diagnosed with erysipelas between 2004 and 2011 at the Department of Dermatology at Sheba Medical Center, Israel. Data included epidemiology, medical background, and course of the disease as documented at admission and during hospitalization. 

Results: Data were collected on 173 patients (66% males) who were divided into two groups: a control group treated with antibiotics only (97 patients) and a study group treated with antibiotics and prednisone (76 patients). The study group presented with a more severe form of erysipelas (bullous) and those patients were hospitalized for a longer period (8.5 vs. 7 days). Nevertheless, the study group exhibited a 71% clinical improvement shortly after being treated with prednisone, without significant side effects. Short-term follow-up revealed more edema in the study group; however, long-term follow-up revealed a higher incidence of erythema and recurrence of erysipelas in the control group. The return to full function was faster in the study group than in the control group. 

Conclusions: Combining prednisone with antibiotics for the treatment of erysipelas should be considered, especially in severe cases. In addition, a prospective double-blind study should be conducted to verify these conclusions.

June 2008
A. Shemer, H. Trau, B. Davidovici, B. Amichai and M.H. Grunwald

Background: Fungal infection of the nail affects millions of people worldwide and has an estimated prevalence of more than 10% of the general population.

Objectives To determinate the prevalence of fungal infection in toenails, in order to decide the treatment policy in onychomycosis.   

Methods: We evaluated 331 patients with suspected clinical toenail onychomycosis affecting at least two toenails. Mycological examination of the affected nails was performed, both the KOH test and fungal culture were used. 

Results: Of 331 patients with psoriasis, 78.2% of the patients had at least three infected nails. The first toenail was the most affected. Trichophyton rubrum was by far the most common dermatophyte cultured from all samples.

Conclusions: Most of the patients had at least three affected toenails. Topical treatment is not effective or practical, and systemic treatment should therefore be considered.
 

A. Shemer, B. Kaplan, N. Nathansohn, M.H. Grunwald, B. Amichai and H. Trau

Background: Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic disease. Malassezia yeasts have been implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease. Antifungal agents are known to be effective in the treatment of Malassezia yeast infections.

Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of itraconazole in the treatment of mild to severe facial seborrheic dermatitis.

Methods: Sixty patients with moderate to severe seborrheic dermatitis were evaluated in an open non-comparative study. Patients were treated with oral itraconazole, initially 200 mg/day for a week, followed by a maintenance therapy of a single dose of 200 mg every 2 weeks. Four clinical parameters (erythema, scaling, burning, itching) were assessed using a 0–3 score. Mycological evaluation determined the presence of Malassezia spores in the scales using a direct smear.

Results: At the end of the initial treatment significant improvement was reported in three clinical parameters: erythema, scaling, itching. Maintenance therapy led to only slight further improvement. Burning sensation was only mildly improved during the treatment. The quantity of Malassezia spores present in the direct smear decreased throughout the treatment period. No blood test abnormalities were found during the treatment.

Conclusions: In this study initial treatment with itraconazole was beneficial in patients with moderate to severe seborrheic dermatitis.

October 2007
N. Nathansohn, A. Orenstein, H. Trau. A. Liran and J. Schachter

Background: Early detection of malignant melanoma of the skin is the most important factor in patient survival. Naked-eye diagnostic sensitivity and specificity are low. Patients with multiple nevi are at high risk to develop melanomas and the clinical follow-up of such patients is difficult, resulting in missed melanomas on the one hand and unnecessary biopsies on the other.

Objectives: To describe the set-up of a special clinic aimed at early detection of melanoma and follow-up of high risk patients and preliminary results from 20 months of operation.

Methods: We established a pigmented lesions clinic based on a digital photography studio enabling documentation and comparison over time of full body photography and dermoscopy.

Results: In the first 20 months of work, 895 patients were seen, 206 of them for follow-up visits. A total of 29,254 photos were taken. Altogether, 236 lesions were suspicious (either clinically or dermoscopically) and the patients were advised to excise them. Seven melanomas were found in this initial examination (which did not include long-term follow-up).

Conclusions: With multimode photographic cutaneous surveillance, early detection of melanoma in high risk patients has been reported. Our clinic utilizes the same techniques and diagnostic algorithm as other leading clinics throughout the world, thus enabling us to deliver better follow-up for those patients.
 

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