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עמוד בית
Mon, 20.05.24

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February 2022
Viacheslav Bard MD, Baruch Brenner MD, and Hanoch Kashtan MD

There has been a general reduction over the last 20 years in the incidence within Israel of gastric cancer (GC). This has particularly been noted in the Jewish population with a slight increase in the incidence of cancer of the gastroesophageal junction among Jews of Sephardi origin. Given the diversity of individual ethnic subpopulations, the effects of GC incidence in second-generation immigrant Jews, particularly from high prevalence regions (e.g., the former Soviet Union, Iraq, and Iran), awaits determination. There are currently no national data on GC-specific mortality. The most recent available cross-correlated Israeli National Cancer Registry (INCR) and International Association for Cancer Research (IARC) incidence data for GC of the body and antrum in Israel are presented. Some of the challenges associated with GC monitoring in the changing Israeli population are discussed. We propose the establishment of a national GC management committee designed to collect demographic and oncological data in operable cases with the aim of recording and improving GC-specific outcomes. We believe that there is value in the development of a national surgical planning program, which oversees training and accreditation in a dynamic environment that favors the wider use of neoadjuvant therapies, minimally invasive surgery and routine extended (D2) lymphadenectomy. These changes should be supported by assessable enhanced recovery programs

October 2021
Ilan Schrier MD, Yael Feferman MD, Yael Berger MD, Dafna Yahav MD, Eran Sadot MD, Omri Sulimani MD, Michael Stein MD, and Hanoch Kashtan MD

Background: Surgical myotomy is the best therapeutic option for patients with achalasia. The minimally invasive technique is considered to be the preferred method for many surgeons. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic myotomy has several advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery. These benefits include more accurate incisions that may result in a lower rate of intra-operative complications.

Objective: To describe our technique of performing robotic-assisted Heller myotomy and to review the initial results of this procedure.

Methods: All patients undergoing robotic-assisted Heller myotomy for achalasia between the years 2012–2018 at Rabin Medical Center were retrospectively reviewed from our institutional prospective database.

Results: Thirty patients underwent robotic-assisted Heller myotomy for achalasia. Mean operative time was 77 minutes (range 47–109 minutes) including docking time of the robotic system. There were no cases of conversion to laparoscopic or open surgery. There were no cases of intra-operative perforation of the mucosa. None of the patients had postoperative morbidity or mortality. Good postoperative results were achieved in 25 patients. Four patients required additional intervention (3 had endoscopic dilatations and 1 with known preoperative endstage achalasia had undergone esophagectomy). One patient was lost to follow-up.

Conclusions: Robotic-assisted Heller myotomy is a safe technique with a low incidence of intra-operative esophageal perforation compared to the laparoscopic approach. We believe that robotic-assisted surgery should be the procedure of choice to treat achalasia

June 2020
Veacheslav Zilbermints MD, Oren Israeli MD, Binyamin Ben Abraham MD, Tuvia Ben-Gal MD, Victor Rubchevsky MD, Dan Aravot MD, Hanoch Kashtan MD, Nikolai Menasherov MD and David Aranovich MD

Background: Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are used more commonly in patients with advanced-stage heart failure. Some of these patients may require elective or urgent abdominal surgical procedures.

Objectives: To determine the outcomes of the management of LVAD-supported patients who underwent elective and urgent abdominal surgical procedures in our institution.

Methods: A retrospective review was conducted on 93 patients who underwent LVAD implantation between August 2008 and January 2017. All abdominal surgeries in these patients were studied, and their impact on postoperative morbidity and mortality was evaluated.

Results: Ten patients underwent abdominal surgical procedures. Of these procedures, five were emergent and five were elective. The elective cases included one bariatric surgery for morbid obesity, one hiatal hernia repair, two cholecystectomies, and one small bowel resection for a carcinoid tumor. The emergency cases included suspected ischemic colitis, right colectomy for bleeding adenocarcinoma, laparotomy due to intraabdominal bleeding, open cholecystectomy for gangrenous cholecystitis, and laparotomy for sternal and abdominal wall infection. All patients undergoing elective procedures survived. Of the five patients who underwent emergency surgery, three died (60%, P = 0.16) and one presented with major morbidity. One of the two survivors required reintervention. In total, 12 interventions were performed on this group of patients.

Conclusions: It is safe to perform elective abdominal procedures for LVAD-supported patients. The prognosis of these patients undergoing emergency surgery is poor and has high mortality and morbidity rates.

December 2019
Daniel Solomon MD, Oleg Kaminski MD, Ilan Schrier MD, Hanoch Kashtan MD and Michael Stein MD

Background: Older age is an independent predictor of worse outcome from traumatic brain injury (TBI). No clear guidelines exist for the management of TBI in elderly patients.

Objectives: To describe the outcomes of elderly patients presenting with TBI and intracranial bleeding (ICB), comparing a very elderly population (≥ 80 years of age) to a younger one (70–79).

Methods: Retrospective analysis of the outcomes of elderly patients presenting with TBI with ICB admitted to a level I trauma center.

Results: The authors analyzed 100 consecutive patients aged 70–79 and 100 patients aged 80 and older. In-hospital mortality rates were 9% and 21% for groups 70–79 and ≥ 80 years old, respectively (P = 0.017). Patients 70–79 years old showed a 12-month survival rate of 73% and a median survival of 47 months. In patients ≥ 80 years old, 12-month survival was 63% and median survival was 27 months (P = NS). In patients presenting with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of ≥ 8, the in-hospital mortality rates were 41% (n=5/12) and 100% (n=8/8). Among patients ≥ 80 years old undergoing emergent surgical decompression, in-hospital mortality was 66% (n=12/18). Survivors presented with a severe drop in their functional score. Survival was dismal in patients ≥ 80 years old who were treated conservatively despite recommended operative guidelines.

Conclusions: There is a lack of reliable means to evaluate the outcome in patients with poor functional status at baseline. The negative prognostic impact of severe TBI is profound, regardless of treatment choices.

October 2018
Sami Gendler MD, Hila Shmilovich MD, David Aranovich MD, Roy Nadler MD, Hanoch Kashtan MD and Michael Stein MD

Background: Unlike the elective treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC), sufficient data and consensual guidelines on acute care are lacking.

Objectives: To analyze a cohort of MCRC patients who required urgent surgery due to acute abdomen and to identify risk factors contributing to the patient's perioperative mortality and morbidity.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of patients diagnosed with stage IV colorectal cancer who required urgent laparotomy at the Rabin Medical Center. Comparative analysis was performed using Pearson’s chi-square and Student`s t-test.

Results: Between 2010 and 2015, 113 patients underwent urgent laparotomy due to colorectal cancer complications, of which 62 patients were found to have a metastatic, stage IV, disease. Large bowel obstruction was the most common indication for urgent laparotomy. In-hospital mortality was 30% (n=19), and overall 30 day mortality was 43%. Fifteen patients (24%) required more than one surgery. The average length of hospital stay was 21 days. Age and lactate levels at presentation were the only prognostic factor found for mortality (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: MCRC laparotomy patients incur a significant burden of care and have a relatively high incidence of early mortality. Our data suggest high, verging on unacceptable, mortality and complication rates in this subgroup of patients. This finding is further accentuated in the subgroup of older patients presenting with lactatemia. These data should be considered by surgeons when discussing treatment options with patients and families.

July 2011
G. Pines, Y. Klein, E. Melzer, E. Idelevich, V. Buyeviz, S. Machlenkin and H. Kashtan

Background: Surgery is considered the mainstay of treatment for esophageal carcinoma. Transhiatal esophagectomy with cervical esophagogastric anastomosis is considered relatively safe with an oncological outcome comparable to that using the transthoracic approach.

Objectives: To review the results of the first 100 transhiatal esophagectomies performed in a single Israeli center.

Methods: The records of all patients who had undergone transhiatal esophagectomy during the period 2003–2009 were reviewed. The study group comprised the first 100 patients. All patients who had undergone colon or small bowel transposition were excluded. Indications for surgery included esophageal cancer, caustic injury and achalasia.

Results: The median follow-up period was 19.5 months. The anastomotic leakage rate was 15% and all were managed successfully with local wound care. The benign stricture rate was 10% and all were managed successfully with endoscopic balloon dilation. Anastomotic leakage was found to be a risk factor for stricture formation. Overall survival was 54%. Response to neoadjuvant therapy was associated with a favorable prognosis.

Conclusions: Transhiatal esophagectomy is a relatively safe approach with adequate oncological results, as long as it is performed in a high volume center.
 

March 2009
S. Machlenkin, E. Melzer, E. Idelevich, N. Ziv-Sokolovsky, Y. Klein and H. Kashtan

Background: The role of endoscopic ultrasound in evaluating the response of esophageal cancer to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is controversial.

Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy of EUS[1] in restaging patients who underwent NAC[2].

Methods: The disease stage of patients with esophageal cancer was established by means of the TNM classification system. The initial staging was determined by chest and abdominal computed tomography and EUS. Patients who needed NAC underwent a preoperative regimen consisting of cisplatin and fluouracil. Upon completion of the chemotherapy, patients were restaged and then underwent esophagectomy. The results of the EUS staging were compared with the results of the surgical pathology staging. This comparison was done in two groups of patients: the study group (all patients who received NAC) and the control group (all patients who underwent primary esophagectomy without NAC).

Results: NAC was conducted in 20 patients with initial stage IIB and III carcinoma of the esophagus (study group). Post-chemotherapy EUS accurately predicted the surgical pathology stage in 6 patients (30%). Pathological down-staging was noted in 8 patients (40%). However, the EUS was able to observe it in only 2 patients (25%). The accuracy of EUS in determining the T status alone was 80%. The accuracy for N status alone was 35%. In 65% of examinations the EUS either overestimated (35%) or underestimated (30%) the N status. Thirteen patients with initial stage I-IIA underwent primary esophagectomy after the initial staging (control group). EUS accurately predicted the surgical pathology disease stage in 11 patients (85%).

Conclusions: EUS is an accurate modality for initial staging of esophageal carcinoma. However, it is not a reliable tool for restaging esophageal cancer after NAC and it cannot predict response to chemotherapy.






[1] EUS = endoscopic ultrasound

[2] NAC = neo-adjuvant chemotherapy

 

June 2008
G. Pines, Y. Klein, A. Ben-Arie, S. Machlenkin and H. Kashtan
July 2006
J.A. Gómez-Puerta, G. Espinosa, J.M. Miró, O. Sued, J.M. Llibre, R. Cervera and J. Font
September 2003
R. Greenberg, Y. Barnea, S. Schneebaum, H. Kashtan, O. Kaplan and Y. Skornik

Background: Drains are inserted in the dissected axilla of most patients during surgery for breast cancer.

Objective: To evaluate the presence and prognostic value of MUC1 and Met-HGF/SF in the axillary drainage of these patients.

Methods: The study group included 40 consecutive patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast who were suitable for breast-conserving treatment; 20 malignant melanoma patients found to have negative axillary sentinel lymph node served as the control group. The output of the drains, which had been placed in the axilla during operation, was collected, and the presence of MUC1, Met-hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor and b-actin were assessed in the lymphatic fluid by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays. The data were compared to the pathologic features of the tumor and the axillary lymph nodes, and to the estrogen and progesterone receptors status.

Results: RT-PCR[1] assays of the axillary lymphatic drainage were positive for MUC1 and Met-HGF/SF[2] in 15 (37.5%) and 26 (65%) of the patients, respectively. Patients in whom MUC1 and Met-HGF/SF were not found in the axillary fluid had smaller tumors and less capillary and lymphatic invasion, compared to patients with positive assays (P < 0.02 for all these comparisons). The lymph nodes were negative for metastases in all patients with negative assays (P < 0.001). The presence of MUC1 and Met-HGF/SF showed negative correlations with the estrogen and progesterone receptors (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: MUC1 and Met-HGF/SF can be detected in the axillary fluids of patients with breast cancer. The expression of both tumor markers in the axillary drainage is strongly associated with unfavorable tumor features and can be used as a prognostic factor.






[1] RT-PCR = reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction



[2] HGF/SF = hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor


March 2001
Eliad Karin, MD, Riad Haddad, MD and Hanoch Kashtan, MD
July 2000
Boaz Sagie, MD, Hanoch Kashtan, MD and Yoram Kluger, MD
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