• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Tue, 23.07.24

Search results


June 2020
Lior Orbach MD, Ido Nachmany MD, Yaacov Goykhman MD, Guy Lahat MD, Ofer Yossepowitch MD, Avi Beri MD, Yanai Ben-Gal MD, Joseph M. Klausner MD and Nir Lubezky MD

Background: Abdominal tumors invading the inferior vena cava (IVC) present significant challenges to surgeons and oncologists.

Objectives: To describe a surgical approach and patient outcomes.

Methods: The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of surgically resected tumors with IVC involvement by direct tumor encasement or intravascular tumor growth. Patients were classified according to level of IVC involvement, presence of intravascular tumor thrombus, and presence of hepatic parenchymal involvement.

Results: Study patients presented with leiomyosarcomas (n=5), renal cell carcinoma (n=7), hepatocellular carcinoma (n=1), cholangiocarcinoma (n=2), Wilms tumor (n=1), neuroblastoma (n=1), endometrial leiomyomatosis (n=1), adrenocortical carcinoma (n=1), and paraganglioma (n=1). The surgeries were conducted between 2010 and 2019. Extension of tumor thrombus above the hepatic veins required a venovenous bypass (n=3) or a full cardiac bypass (n=1). Hepatic parenchymal involvement required total hepatic vascular isolation with in situ hepatic perfusion and cooling (n=3). Circular resection of IVC was performed in five cases. Six patients had early postoperative complications, and the 90-day mortality rate was 10%. Twelve patients were alive, and six were disease-free after a mean follow-up of 1.6 years.

Conclusions: Surgical resection of abdominal tumors with IVC involvement can be performed in selected patients with acceptable morbidity and mortality. Careful patient selection, and multidisciplinary involvement in preoperative planning are key for optimal outcome.

January 2020
Danit Dayan MD, Subhi Abu-Abeid MD, Joseph Kuriansky MD, Guy Lahat MD and Boaz Sagie MD

Background: Primary retroperitoneal neoplasms (PRN) arise from diverse retroperitoneal tissues. Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) comprise the majority and are well studied. Other non-sarcomatous PRN are very rare and less familiar.

Objectives: To evaluate the clinicopathologic and radiologic features of non-sarcomatous PRN, as well as the outcome of complete tumor resection (TR).

Methods: Retrospective data were collected on consecutive patients (June 2006 to January 2015) who underwent resection of retroperitoneal lesions at our department. Final pathology of non-sarcomatous PRN was included.

Results: The study population included 36 patients (26% with PRN). PRN were neurogenic (17%), fat-containing (3%), and cystic (6%). The preoperative diagnosis was correct in only 28%. All patients underwent TR via laparotomy (72%) or laparoscopy (28%), for mean operative time of 120 ± 46 minutes. En bloc organ resection was performed in 11%. Complete TR was achieved in 97%. Intra-operative spillage occurred in 8%. Intra-operative, 90-day postoperative complications, and mortality rates were 11%, 36%, and 0%, respectively. The mean length of stay was 6.5 ± 5.5 days. The median overall survival was 53 ± 4.9 months.

Conclusions: Familiarity with radiologic characteristics of PRN is important for appropriate management. Counter to STS, other PRN are mostly benign and have an indolent course. Radical surgery is not required, as complete TR confers good prognosis. Expectant management is reserved for small, asymptomatic, benign neoplasms.

July 2009
G. Lahat, I. Nachmany, E. Itzkowitz, S. Abu-Abeid, E. Barazovsky, O. Merimsky and J. Klauzner

Background: Sporadic abdominal desmoid tumors are rare and data on these tumors as a distinct disease entity are lacking. Previous abdominal surgery, trauma, pregnancy and estrogen intake are considered risk factors. Although desmoidsare benign, invasion and a high recurrence rate are common.

Objectives: To evaluate outcomes of surgery for this rare disease.

Methods: Since 1995, 16 patients with pathologically confirmed desmoid tumor were operated on in our center. All familial adenomatous polyposis patients were excluded. A retrospective analysis of data was performed.

Results:
Of the 16 patients 12 (75%) were females. Mean age was 40.5 years (range 24-70). Thirteen patients were symptomatic and 3 were incidentally diagnosed. All patients presented with an isolated mass; 7 (50%) originated in the abdominal wall, 6 (37.5%) were retroperitoneal and 3 were (18.8%) mesenteric. All tumors except one were completely excised. Morbidity was low with no mortality. One patient was reoperated due to involved margins. None of the patients had recurrence within a median follow-up of 64 months (range 5-143).

Conclusions: The perception of sporadic abdominal desmoids as tumors with a high recurrence rate (20-70%) is probably incorrect. Adequate surgery with wide margins leads to a very low recurrence rate; cure is a legitimate goal.

 

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel