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עמוד בית
Sat, 20.07.24

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May 2020
Ilya Polishchuk MD, Demian Halperin MD, Ahmed Algedafy MD, Jorge-Shmuel Delgado MD, Mariana Zamir MD and Doron Zamir MD

Background: There is a lack of information regarding acute pancreatitis in Israel. However, the most prevalent worldwide etiologic causes of acute pancreatitis are biliary stones and alcohol abuse.

Objectives: To delineate the prevalence, main causes, rate of recurrence, mortality, and complications of acute pancreatitis in southern Israel.

Methods: In this retrospective study medical files of all hospitalized patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis during a 13-year period were reviewed.

Results: The study comprised 602 patients with acute pancreatitis (120/100,000 patients or 1.2/1000 admissions). The main causes were: biliary stones (41.5%), alcohol (8.8%), and drugs (8.3%). Disothiazide was the most common drug associated with acute pancreatitis followed by sitagliptin, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and simvastatin. Undetermined etiology made up 33.6% of the cases. Recurrence rate was 33.8% (alcohol 3.7%, hypertriglyceridemia 1.8%). This finding had no implications on mortality rate, which was stable at 4.3%. Bilateral pleural effusion, advanced computed tomography severity index (CTSI) grading, older age, and being single were found to be poor prognostic predictive factors.

Conclusions: Biliary pancreatitis is the main cause of acute pancreatitis in southern Israel, similar to the rest of the world, and constitutes a much more common etiology than alcohol. Furthermore, drug-induced pancreatitis is a common etiology, with disothiazide being the most common drug associated with pancreatitis followed by ACE-Inhibitors, sitagliptin, and simvastatin. Recurrence of pancreatitis is common in this geographic area, and older age, advanced CTSI grading, bilateral pleural effusion, and being single are all poor prognostic predictive factors.

May 2019
March 2015
Olga Reitblat MD, Tsahi T. Lerman MD, Olga Grisko MD, Anna Gelfand MD, Azaria Simonovich MD, Galina Novokhatko MD, Doron Zamir MD and Tatiana Reitblat MD
July 2014
February 2004
D. Zamir, I. Leibovitz, I. Polyschuch, T. Reitblat and G. Lugassy
February 2003
May 2001
Gabriel E. Feldman, MD, MPH

Background: Hepatitis B is a major problem worldwide. Israel has intermediate endemicity for hepatitis B virus, and an annual carrier rate of 1-3%.

Objective: To evaluate both the prevalence of HBV infection among family members of HBV carriers and the competence of family practitioners in performing a compre­hensive assessment.

Methods: A total of 152 HB surface antigen-positive blood donors were discovered in our subdistrict during the years 1993-97. Their family physicians were questioned regarding the patients' family members. Specific information on 85 spouses and 200 children was also obtained.

Results: Among the 85 married carriers, 5 of the spouses (5.9%) were found to be HBsAg positive. None of the 200 children was HB5Ag positive. We found that in a third (n=52) of the patients, the sexual partner had never been tested by a primary care physician. Patients were not routinely tested for HB e antigen or anti-HBe antibodies. Neither the parents nor the siblings had undergone any serological evaluation. How­ever, most family members of the carriers had received an HBV vaccine from their family physicians.

Conclusions: Our findings show that horizontal transmis­sion of HBV among spouses of HBV carriers still exists. We did not find any vertical transmission, probably due to male predominance and previous vaccination. Family physicians should be trained to perform an extensive serological evalua­tion of family members of patients with chronic HBV infection, including parents and siblings, and should vaccinate sero­negative family members.

June 2000
Paltiel Weiner MD, Joseph Waizman MD, Margalit Weiner PhD, Marinella Rabner MD, Rasmi Magadle MD and Doron Zamir MD

Background: Cigarette smoking is a major contributor to the risk of acute myocardial infarction and the subsequent morbidity and mortality. Physicians can play an important role in smoking cessation among patients with AMI because of their frequent contact with the patient during the event.

Objectives: To study the prevalence of smoking, age, localization of coronary occlusion, mortality and rate of smoking cessation in consecutive patients who were diagnosed with a first AMI in our center in 1989–93.

Methods: The study included 1,510 consecutive patients with first AMI: 973 men (512 smokers, 52.6%) and 537 women (215 smokers, 40%), whose mean age was 64.1±6.7 and 68.6±5.2 years respectively.

Results: The median age at the first AMI in non-smoking and smoking men differed significantly (70.4±6.8 vs. 56.6±6.1 years, P<0.001) while the difference in the women was smaller (70.4±6.9 vs. 66.8±7.2). The proportion of smokers/non-smokers among men was greater at a younger age and decreased proportionally with age. The overall mortality was 11.3% with a significant difference in mortality rate in the younger age groups between smokers and non-smokers (1% vs. 0% in the age group 31–40 years, P<0.05, and 6.1% vs. 0.8% in the 41–50 year age group, P<0.001). Only 62% of the smokers who survived the AMI declared that they had received anti-smoking advice from a physician during hospitalization. The cessation rate in this group was significantly higher than in smokers who had not been cautioned against smoking (56% vs. 18%).

Conclusions: Current smokers sustained their first AMI more than one decade earlier than non-smokers, and the younger smokers had a higher mortality rate. The majority of the smokers who received anti-smoking advice during their hospitalization for AMI quit smoking in the year following the acute event. 

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AMI= acute myocardial infarction

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