• IMA sites
  • IMAJ services
  • IMA journals
  • Follow us
  • Alternate Text Alternate Text
עמוד בית
Sat, 18.05.24

Search results


November 2021
Dana Zelnik Yovel MD, Galina Goltsman MD, Itamar Y love MD, Noam Darnell MD, and Micha J. Rapoport MD

Background: The recent increase in enterococcal urinary tract infections (EUTI) and the potential morbidity and mortality associated with inappropriate antimicrobial treatment underscores the need for early risk assessment and institution of appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy.

Objectives: To identify high-risk features associated with hospitalized patients with EUTI.

Methods: Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and bacteriological data of 285 patients hospitalized with UTI during 2016 were retrieved from the computerized database of Shamir Medical Center. Patients were divided into two groups: EUTI and non-EUTI (NEUTI), according to the presence or absence of enterococcus in the urine culture. The features of the two groups were compared.

Results: We obtained 300 urine cultures from 285 patients. Of the total, 80 patients (26.6%) had EUTI and 220 patients (73.3%) had NEUTI. A higher prevalence of urinary multi-bacterial cultures was found in EUTI compared to NEUTI patients (P < 0.01). Higher prevalence of permanent indwelling urinary catheter and dementia were found in hospitalized patients with community-acquired EUTI and nosocomial EUTI respectively (P = 0.02, P = 0.016) compared to patients with NEUTI.

Conclusions: Indwelling urinary catheter and dementia are risk factors for EUTI in patients with community and hospital acquired infection, respectively

April 2021
Michal A. Julius MD, Dror Cantrell MD, Saleh Sharif MD, Dana Zelnik Yovel MD, and Micha J. Rapoport MD

Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID‐19) is recognized as a respiratory illness, which includes pulmonary consolidations, hypoxemic states, and hypercoagulopathic tendencies with a broad clinical severity. Recently, more reports have described post-infection manifestations. These include multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) with more than 400 cases published since the start of the coronavirus disease pandemic. In October 2020, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published 27 cases [1] describing the new multi-system inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A). Nine of the cases were reported directly to the CDC, 7 from published case reports and another 11 patients found in three distinct case series

December 2016
Yuval Konstantino MD, Dana Zelnik Yovel BSc, Michael D. Friger PhD, Gideon Sahar MD, Boris Knyazer MD and Guy Amit MD MPH

Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, occurring in 20%–40% of patients, mostly during the first week after surgery. It is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, but data are limited. 

Objectives: To assess the correlation between new-onset in-hospital AF following CABG and long-term AF, cerebrovascular accident (CVA), or death.

Methods: We conducted an analysis of 161 consecutive patients who underwent isolated CABG surgery in a tertiary center during the period 2002–2003. 

Results: Patients’ mean age was 72 years, and the majority were males (77%). Approximately half of the patients experienced prior myocardial infarction, and 14% had left ventricular ejection fraction < 40%. Postoperative AF (POAF) occurred in 27% of the patients. Patients were older and had larger left atrium diameter. POAF was strongly correlated with late AF (OR 4.34, 95%CI 1.44–13.1, P = 0.01) during a mean follow-up of 8.5 years. It was also correlated with long-term stroke but was not associated with long-term mortality. 

Conclusions: POAF is a common complication of CABG surgery, which is correlated with late AF and stroke. Patients with POAF should be closely monitored to facilitate early administration of anticoagulant therapy in a high risk population upon recurrence of AF. 

 

Legal Disclaimer: The information contained in this website is provided for informational purposes only, and should not be construed as legal or medical advice on any matter.
The IMA is not responsible for and expressly disclaims liability for damages of any kind arising from the use of or reliance on information contained within the site.
© All rights to information on this site are reserved and are the property of the Israeli Medical Association. Privacy policy

2 Twin Towers, 35 Jabotinsky, POB 4292, Ramat Gan 5251108 Israel