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עמוד בית
Mon, 15.07.24

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April 2024
Avi Ohry MD, Esteban González-López MD PhD

Testimonies, articles, or books on Nazi medical atrocities written by physicians, whether Holocaust survivors or not and whether written during the Holocaust or just after 1945, are very important teaching materials. The professional views of physicians give special insight. In this review we highlighted a few biographical and eyewitness accounts by Jewish physicians about their medical activities and the inhuman medical activities of the Nazis. The activities of Jewish doctors in the ghettos and camps, including research projects on hunger or infectious diseases, are truly suitable case studies. We presented representative case studies that can be effectively introduced in medical school curricula.

Avi Ohry MD

Being in captivity as a prisoner of war (POW) and held by a hostile government usually occurs after a war. In general, wounded POWs do not receive proper medical treatment while being imprisoned or confined in a jail or a camp. War captivity could mean isolation, constant interrogations, humiliation, torture, malnutrition, starvation, and poor hygienic conditions. Immediately, or sometimes years after repatriation, mental and physical problems appear, which disturb the POW's social, family, and work networks. The suggested post-captivity condition assembles, under one umbrella, the various phenomena and complications after war captivity.

July 2023
Avi Ohry MD

This letter was inspired by the book The Road to the Open by the Austrian Jewish physician, author, and playwright Arthur Schnitzler [1]. In the Viennese fin-de-siecle era, with its famous physicians (Sigmund Freud, Josef Breuer, Róbert Bárány), musicians (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Franz Schubert, Joseph Haydn, Gustav Mahler, Arnold Schoenberg, Johann Strauss II), and artists (Ernst and Gustav Klimt, Oskar Kokoschka, Egon Schiele), Schnitzler described the antisemitic atmosphere and the intellectual community's influence.

May 2023
Avi Ohry MD

Familial spastic paraparesis is a non-progressive disorder. However, clinical experience shows that after trauma, disease, surgery, or limb fracture that force a patient's long immobilization, a significant functional deterioration is observed. I describe two patients with Silver syndrome who experienced such functional deterioration after sustaining a simple fracture. A description of Silver syndrome and a biographical sketch of Dr. Silver, who explained the disorder in 1966, are given.

March 2023
Abedallh Hamad MD, Frida Shemesh MD, Avi Ohry MD, Yekaterina Slutzky MD, Valeria Kaplan RN MA, Svetlana Kartoon MD, Raphael Joseph Heruti MD

Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), or toxic epidermal necrolysis, is a rare syndrome that develops after an allergic reaction to a medication [1,2]. It affects the skin and the mucocutaneous tissue. Individuals diagnosed with SJS are rarely referred to a rehabilitation medicine (RM) facility.

The annual prevalence of SJS is about one in one million. The skin is covered with blisters. Usually, it affects about 10 % of body surface area. The patients are treated usually by ophthalmologists, dermatologists, allergologists, and immunologists. When severe complications occur, plastic surgeons and intensive care physicians may also be involved. Few publications were found that linked SJS with comprehensive rehabilitation treatment [3-5].

July 2022
Avi Ohry MD and Esteban González-López MD PhD

Dr. Joseph Weill was a French Jewish doctor who made significant contributions to the knowledge of hunger disease in the refugee camps in southern France during World War II. He was involved with the clandestine network of escape routes for Jewish children from Nazi-occupied France to Switzerland

October 2005
S. Yust-Katz, M. Katz-Leurer, L. Katz, Y. Lerman, K. Slutzki and A. Ohry.
 Background: Population structures are changing across the western world, with particularly rapid growth in the number of very old people. Life expectancy has been increasing gradually over years, resulting in a larger subpopulation of people aged 90 and over.

Objectives: To describe the sociodemographic, medical and functional characteristics of people aged 80–90 and 90+ who were admitted to a sub-acute geriatric hospital and to compare the hospitalization outcomes between these subgroups.

Methods: We compared the demographic and clinical data (extracted by means of chart review) of two groups of elderly who were admitted to the Reuth Medical Center during 2001–2002: those aged 90+ and those 80–89. Among survivors, the main outcome measures at discharge were mortality rate, functional ability, and place of residence.

Results: The study included 108 patients who were admitted to different divisions of Reuth: 55 patients aged 90+ and 53 aged 80–90. The mortality rate was significantly elevated in the older age group (49.1% vs. 28.1% in the younger age group) on multivariate analysis. The most important prognostic factors for mortality were incontinence (odds ratio 3.45) and being dependent before admission (OR[1] 4.76). Among survivors an association was found between being incontinent and dependent before hospitalization, and being dependent on discharge.

Conclusions: The main prognostic factors for mortality and functional outcome in patients admitted to a non-acute geriatric hospital are incontinence and functional state prior to admission, and not age per se.

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[1] OR = odds ratio

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