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עמוד בית
Wed, 17.07.24

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May 2023
Daniel Leshin-Carmel MD, Aino Shperber MD, Inessa Minz MD, David Hassin MD, Daniel Starobin MD

Metastatic pulmonary calcinosis (MPC) is characterized by deposits of calcium in normal pulmonary parenchyma. Diffuse pulmonary calcinosis commonly occurs in hypercalcemia and/or hyperphosphatemia and is more commonly related to renal failure than primary hyperparathyroidism, skeletal metastases, or multiple myeloma [1]. Calcium depositions favor alkaline tissue and are thus more common in the upper lobes of the lung, which have a higher ventilation to perfusion ratio and a low capillary pCO2, resulting in an alkaline pH [2]. Therefore, the most common radiographic manifestation consists of poorly defined nodular opacities bilaterally in the upper lung zones [3].

January 2015
Yehiel Ziv MD, Avinoam Nevler MD, Ehud Willenz DVM, Ofer Doron, Andrew Zbar MD, Aino Shperber MD and Judith Sandbank MD

Background: New animal models provide insights into the pathogenesis of different types of inflammatory bowel disease as well as novel pathways for new therapeutic options. However, the scarcity of large animal models hinders the research and development of new surgical procedures and technological devices in inflammatory bowel disease surgery. Common small animal inducible models involve chemical agents that result in the development of acute intestinal inflammation.

Objectives: To assess a novel method for the induction of Crohn’s-like colitis using intramural injection of sclerosants in a porcine model.

Methods: Seven domestic pigs underwent several experimental protocols to assess the efficacy of intramural colonic injections of two different compounds (lauromacrogol, and phenol in almond oil). Twenty-five different large bowel segments were treated with intramural injections of the compounds. The animals were followed for 6 weeks, and treated colonic segments were resected for histopathological examination.

Results: Intramural injection of lauromacrogol resulted in non-specific, mild reactive foreign body changes only. Injection of various dosages of 5% phenol in almond oil caused a range of histopathological changes varying from focal fibrosis to Crohn’s-like reactions comprising acute and chronic infiltrates, mucosal ulceration and focal necrosis with enteric and lymphoid non-caseating granulomas.

Conclusions: Intramural colonic phenol in almond oil injection in pigs induces inflammatory reactions that histologically resemble Crohn's disease in humans. 

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