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עמוד בית
Fri, 12.07.24

ORIGINAL ARTICLES

IMAJ | volume 24

Journal 9, September 2022
pages: 602-605

BladeShield 101: A Novel Prehospital Digital Wearable Combat Casualty Card

1Trauma and Combat Medicine Branch, Surgeon General's Headquarters, Israel Defense Forces, Ramat Gan, Israel 2Azrieli Faculty of Medicine, Bar-Ilan University, Safed, Israel Departments of 3Medicine B and 4Internal Medicine E, and 5Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel 6Hospital Management, Meir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, Israel 7Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel 8Department of Plastic Surgery, Shamir Medical Center, Zriffin, Israel

Summary

Background:

The Israeli Defense Forces-Medical Corps (IDF-MC) focuses on reducing preventable death by improving prehospital trauma care. High quality documentation of care can serve casualty care and to improve future care. Currently, paper casualty cards are used for documentation. Incomplete data acquisition and inadequate data handover are common. To resolve these deficits, the IDF-MC launched the BladeShield 101 project.

Objectives:

To assess the quality of casualty care data acquired by comparing standard paper casualty cards with the BladeShield 101.

Methods:

The BladeShield 101 system consists of three components: a patient unit that records vital signs and medical care provided, a medical sensor that transmits to the patient unit, and a ruggedized mobile device that allows providers to access and document information. We compared all trauma registries of casualties treated between September 2019 and June 2020.

Results:

The system was applied during the study period on 24 patients. All data were transferred to the military trauma registry within one day, compared to 72% (141/194) with a paper casualty card (P < 0.01). Information regarding treatment time was available in 100% vs. 43% (P < 0.01) of cases and 98% vs. 67% (P < 0.01) of treatments provided were documented comparing BladeShield 101 with paper cards, respectively.

Conclusions:

Using an autonomous system to record, view, deliver, and store casualty information may resolve most current information flow deficits. This solution will ultimately significantly improve individual patient care and systematic learning and development processes.

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