Original Articles

Clinical and Echocardiographic Predictors of Morbidity and Mortality in Infective Endocarditis: The Significance of Vegetation Size

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Click on the icon on the upper right hand side for the article by Israel Gotsman, MD, Amichai Meirovitz, MD, Nilli Meizlish, RN BA, Mervyn Gotsman, MD FRCP FACC, Chaim Lotan, MD FACC and Dan Gilon, MD FACC.
IMAJ 2007: 9: April: 365-369
Abstract

Background: Infective endocarditis is a common disease with significant morbidity and mortality.


Objectives: To define clinical and echocardiographic parameters predicting morbidity and in-hospital mortality in patients with infective endocarditis hospitalized in a tertiary hospital from 1991 to 2000.


Methods: All patients with definite IE diagnosed according to the Duke criteria were included. We examined relevant clinical features that might influence outcome.


Results: The study group comprised 100 consecutive patients, 77 with native valve and 23 with prosthetic valve endocarditis. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 8%. There was a higher mortality in the PVE[1] group compared to the NVE[2] group (13% vs. 7%, P = 0.07). The mortality rate in each group, with or without surgery, was not significantly different. Clinical predictors of mortality were older age and hospital-acquired endocarditis. The presence of vegetations and their size were significant predictors of major embolic events and mortality. Staphylococcus aureus was a predictor of mortality (25% vs. 5%, P < 0.005) and abscess formation. Multivariate logistic analysis identified vegetation size and S. aureus as independent predictors of mortality.


Conclusions: Mortality is higher in older hospitalized patients. S. aureus is associated with a poor outcome. Vegetation size is an independent predictor of embolic events and of a higher mortality.








[1]PVE = prosthetic valve endocarditis

[2]NVE = native valve endocarditis